Posted in beginner teachers, high school, middle school

Why teach middle school?

Why I choose to be a middle school math teacher.

In my third year as a middle school teacher, I have days that beg me to question why I ever chose to become a middle school teacher. Grades in middle school do not matter, so grades are not any sort of incentive to do well. Middle school student brains are in a major developing phase, so they are constantly unable to control their voices or actions. They are more reactive than reflective. They still need me to be “mom” at times, which is a role I do not play well. They are still learning major school-life lessons like remembering to put their names on homework, learning how to work a locker lock, and listening, writing, and thinking at the same time.

I have a lot of nostalgic feelings about teaching high school students because of middle school students. I miss the conversations I had with high school students. I miss Algebra 2 and Geometry. I miss the 2pm end time. I miss being the teacher they turn to for a life talk. I miss watching students grow up from being young naive teenagers to young adults with whole futures ahead of them. All that nostalgia does go away though because like every memory, we always remember the good of the past and compare it to the negative of the present.

During the dark cold days of winter, I needed to remind myself of why I stuck around with being a middle school teacher. Being a high school teacher laid the grounds for me, but being a middle school teacher has changed me for the better.

Before, I never understood why middle school math was so difficult to learn or teach. After my first year as a middle school teacher, I took back every negative thought I had about middle school math. Teaching algebra came naturally, but teaching pre-algebra and math 6 have never felt so foreign. I frequently felt like an inadequate teacher. Trying to explain the logic behind dividing fractions or why the denominator changes with ratio addition but not with fraction addition still do not come as naturally as teaching how to factor a polynomial. To make up for my inexperience and natural inability for teaching middle school concepts, I read about math and teaching math. I surrounded myself with people and books, which supported my growth as a teacher. I could not be more appreciative of middle school math teachers. I feel like a better math teacher because of this middle school experience.

With the end of school year in sight, I have learned a few more things. The students themselves have really inspired me. Weeks ago, one of the most behaviorally difficult students came up to me and held me by the shoulders, telling me how much he actually joins math now. Another student, who was so scared to meet me during open house because I was her math teacher, told me that she loves math and couldn’t believe how much she didn’t enjoy it before. And of course, I got that letter that every teacher dreams of getting. The letter that tells you how much you have touched their lives and that they wouldn’t be where they are without you. These students remind me that I have a huge impact on them even if they are not quite ready to harness the impact teachers have on them. Lastly, I get to be the teacher who preps them for the “scary” world of high school.

Even though I never thought I would be middle school math teacher, I would not trade these last three years for three years as a high school teacher. The experiences and knowledge I have gained has made me the teacher I have always wanted to be. I may never feel confident teaching middle school concepts, but I know I will get better every year that I teach. Students may overwhelm me with their lack of control, but I know I am reaching them. I know they appreciate me and want to be their best when given the opportunity.

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Author:

I have been teaching math for 6 years. I currently teach middle school math (Accelerated Algebra 1, Algebra 1, and Math 6) in St. Paul. I have taught Geometry and Algebra 2 in the past.

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