Posted in high school, middle school, resources

Problem Solving with Struggling Learners

I teach a class called Geometry Concepts, geared primarily toward high school sophomores who struggle with math. Much of the time, there is the ever present pressure of meeting the standards, teaching them formulas, and practicing properties that truly don’t mean much to these kids.

I have been thinking a lot about what I can do to best serve these struggling learners, and it led me to the name of the class: “Geometry Concepts“. I feel like my job with these kids is to help the build on the concepts, the bigger ideas that are much more transferable to their lives. I don’t just teach quadrilaterals, I use quadrilaterals to teach “classification,” the same ideas they use in science and English.  I don’t just teach parallel lines, I teach them about driving and all of the lines used (they are getting there licenses this year).

Anyway, we spent the last two days finding areas of polygons and we did some really nice problems where they had to find the area of a lame triangle with a base of 12 and a height of 7. Very applicable, I know. Even though we have been practicing these formulas, I feel like they needed a different approach to area. So for a Friday, I scrapped the quiz and instead gave them one task: find the area of the carpet in the room.

This immediately took my class from bored note-taking to genuine curiosity. I had a prime opportunity to build some real problem solving skills with kids who don’t like to be challenged. We discussed how we could approach the problem, how to make a diagram of the room, and how to account for the cabinets, furnace, and other non-carpeted areas. Then they spent class measuring, recording, and calculating.

My initial concern was that we weren’t practicing the formulas; they were just finding a bunch of rectangles. But this was the most engaged I have ever seen these kids. These were the hardest rectangles these kids had ever seen in their lives and they went with it. They did some genuine problem solving. Today, my struggling math students got a real feel for what area is and how to find it without looking at a piece of paper.

The other perk? All it took was a bucket of tape measures and 30 seconds of prep time.

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Posted in beginner teachers, elementary school, high school, middle school, resources

Your own professional development

Professional Development…..what does it mean to you?

We go to meetings and workshops. We attend sessions on how to do this or that. We listen to an “expert” speak. We read blogs like this. But why? For many teachers, it’s to fulfill clock hours or a demand from higher up. But for me, it’s what I relish.

Yes, I do dread some of the things we must do and some of sessions we sit in, but professional development gets my gears in motion. It pushes me to think about that kid, who has A in class, but I haven’t talked to yet that week. It pushes me to try to get to that kid who can barely multiply single digit numbers. It pushes me to think about that colleague said about how to teach slope. Professional development challenges me to do what I have not done yet or what I am striving to be better at.

Every year, I look forward to the MCTM (Minnesota Council of Teachers of Mathematics) conference in Duluth. It’s a little cold and a little too small for this city girl, but I love the feeling of getting the chance to improve myself and to see my classroom with fresh eyes. It also gets me through the rest of the year because May can be a very long month when I have no refresh ideas. I love seeing fellow math colleagues display what they are proud of and share it with the rest of us. I love that I might possibly walk into a session where it gives me the answer I have been looking for. I love that I get to see old tricks done in a new light. MCTM is the creme of the creme when it comes to professional development for me. But until then, what do I do?

I can’t wait for the once a year professional development to inspire me. I can’t wait for it to answer the burning thoughts and questions I have now. Where do I turn? The WORLD WIDE WEB.

Twitter: It is a great wealth of knowledge full of people all over the world who are willing to share. I am not an avid Tweeter (is that the word for people who Tweet?), but when I need something new, I turn there. Math celebrities like Dan Meyer @ddmeyer, Christopher Danielson @trianglemancsd, Andrew Stadel @mr_stadel, and Fawn Nguyen @fawnpnguyen, to name a few, have inspired me to use photos, videos, music, technology, and the internet in my math lessons. They don’t only inspire but create practical instructional ideas and activities that are ready to use. Join and find other math teachers like you who want to inspire. Join discussions on best practices. Get advice on what to do next when students already get it. Your fellow math teachers have a lot to share on Twitter, so join, even if it’s just for professional use. Follow me while you’re you are searching through Twitter. @mctmCONNECT

Blogs: There are many great ideas floating out there from actual teachers, who have tried and true tested activities. They are the ones who provide answers for when I am in need of a great slope activity or just a great problem solving activity. I have learned organizational skills and management ideas from bloggers. I read about what they like and dislike about certain websites or technology. They are my professional circle when I can’t articulate what I want but know what I need when I see it.  Some of my favorites are:

http://iheartedtech.blogspot.com/

https://middleschoolmathmania.wordpress.com/

http://mathequalslove.blogspot.com/

Welcome

http://walkinginmathland.weebly.com/

http://www.ipads4teaching.net/

Pinterest: I never thought that I would be into a site like Pinterest. I was not interested in using it because of its addictive nature. I was really wrong. I found so much on Pinterest that I had to start my own account. I have a board dedicated to math and education only. Note-taking ideas and foldables are of abundance. Creative math “decor” and student made projects have transformed my classroom from a dull and empty (typical) secondary math teacher’s classroom to one that is vibrant and shows off student work. I have never had all my walls and even parts of my windows covered in work from students or posters I created for students. I have a rational number line, created by students, and see the benefit it has provided my students. Pinterest is a place to find and “steal” from teachers who have awesome ideas.

I may love learning and reading about teaching on the internet, but nothing beats professional development where you can discuss and debate with fellow teachers. You may not feel the same way I do, but find a personal purpose for that professional development. As you sit there through another session, by choice or not, use the following to push yourself beyond the days or hours of professional development:

1. Use it immediately and not just file it away. Decide how you use what you just heard/learned to change your next lesson.

2. Find a colleague to share it with especially if they were not in attendance.

3. Make a new friend during the professional development if you are there with a bunch of strangers.

4. Introduce yourself to the presenter if what they said or did really hit the nail on the head.

5. If possible, walk out of the session if you know it’s not for you. There is nothing worse than to sit through a session that you don’t find useful or helpful. I know that this is not always possible, but then you just do what #1-4 said. 🙂

How are you pushing yourself to learn from others and yourself?